Nov 14 2012
Testing Changes Coming for GED
Wednesday, 14 November 2012

0 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
            Changes in the content and the way GED testing is done means that those seeking to earn their GED may want to hit the books a bit harder.
            That’s because, starting January 2014, all previous in-progress tests will no longer be counted and applicants will need to start from scratch with the new testing regime. And Kodiak College, which conducts local GED testing warns that new tests are longer, more challenging, more expensive and computerized.
            Adelia Myrick runs the adult basic education program at the college, which includes the GED program. She says a lot of people think the GED is a simple test. But that is totally not true. The GED is a set of five tests on different subjects and often takes months to prepare for.

:

GED Testing 1    :49  “There are certain advantages of getting a high school diploma…does take them a long time.”

    Myrick says, that under the new national requirements, a person either has their GED by the end of 2013 or they start all over:
   
GED Testing 2   :32   “So let’s say  that you passed the reading and the social study section …we have no control over the deadline.”

    Myrick says somewhere between 60 and 80 Kodiak students have started the testing process and risk losing their test credits if they don’t finish:

GED Testing 3   :38   “But we get a lot of …who could theoretically get it done before the deadline.”

    Myrick says classes begin in January for students needing help preparing for the GED exams. You can call the college for more information.
                            ###