Jul 20 2009
Salmon Bounty Goes Beyond Tasty Fillets
Monday, 20 July 2009

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            There have been tens of million salmon harvested so far this summer in Alaska waters, but only part of each fish is turned into tasty fillets. Salmon roe, of course, is a delicacy in Japan, but what happens to the rest of the fish?

            Peter Bechtel is a scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Fairbanks. He says the parts of a salmon that do not wind up on the grill hold a lot of possibilities.You can find out more about the value-added uses for Alaska's seafood at the Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation website .

 

--          (Fish Waste 1             54 sec              "First of all you can make ... providing an economic return.")

 

            Here in Kodiak, Bechtel says one company turns much of the fish gurry into products:

 

--          (Fish Waste 2             20 sec              "By and large, Bio-Dry ... regulatory procedures in place.")

 

            Bechtel says there is an economy of scale that comes into play when making fish byproducts:

 

--          (Fish Waste 3             32 sec              "It's really a challenge ... nice opportunities in those areas.")

 

            It's not just salmon waste that can provide the raw materials for seafood byproducts - Bechtel says pollock oil is the number one byproduct coming out of the state's fisheries. 

 

 

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