pic2.jpg

Donate to KMXT

DonateNow
wayback_kodiakbuttoncopy.jpg

My Five

MyFiveButton.jpg

Support Public Radio

You can support public radio through underwriting and we can help you drive traffic to your place of business by reaching the educated, affluent and decidedly handsome KMXT listeners. Contact This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it today!

Station Blogs & Links

Freeform
Are you a KMXT volunteer with a blog or website about your show? This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

kmxt-sustain-bag-front.jpg

Listen to KMXT live!


Copyright vEsti24
facebook-button.jpg

Polls

Repealing SB21 (Oil Tax Reform) In favor of repeal (VOTING YES) ?
 

The LegHead Report

legheadreport.jpg LegHead (ledj-hed) Report weekdays at 12:20 p.m.

Fish Radio with Laine Welch

fish-radio-logo.jpg
 Weekdays at 12:20 p.m.
afr-logo-aprn-100dpi-web.jpg
10am - Noon on KODK 90.7FM

 

 

 

Not into Classical music, you say? How about Rock, Blues, Indy, Folk, Native, Americana, Funk, Electronica, Reggae, World, Roots and Alternative? Whatever floats your boat, it's sure to be found on Undercurrents. 10am - noon Monday thru Friday on KODK, 90.7FM. 

 
Feb 27 2014
Turning the Tide Against Marine Debris: Part Two
Thursday, 27 February 2014

4.9 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

debris_on_beach.jpg

Even from 500 feet above, multicolored marine debris is visible from beaches on Shuyak Island. Kodiak Island Trails Network Director Andy Schroeder uses aerial surveys like this to help plan upcoming clean ups. Brianna Gibbs Photo

 

 

 

This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Today we bring you part two of our series examining marine debris, and where places in Alaska, specifically Kodiak, stand in clean up efforts.
            When the Japanese Tsuanmi washed away entire towns three years ago, it left much of the West Coast of the United States wondering if and when debris would start showing up on American shorelines. Less than eight months later, it did, and has continued to wash up since.            

            Clean up efforts have been well underway, but funding those operations is a huge part of the battle. KMXT’s Brianna Gibbs has more on the financial side of marine debris. 

 

 
Feb 26 2014
As Deadline Looms, Afognak Speaks Out on Malmberg Homestead
Wednesday, 26 February 2014

2.77 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

in-front-of-house-1985.jpg

Grace and Tom Malmberg with their first four children in front of their growing homestead in 1985. Photos courtesy Mieke Malmberg

 

This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
    On Saturday, a long time Kodiak family will no longer be allowed into the home they built over 30 years ago. Nor will they be allowed to step on the land the home occupies. That’s because when Tom and Grace Malmberg placed their small cabin on the shores of Dry Spruce Bay, it was a few dozen yards over their property line.
    After being sued in 2012 by the property owner, Afognak Native Corporation, and facing a huge clean-up bill if they lost in court, the Malmbergs agreed to accept a $10,000 buy-out offer from the corporation one year ago. And one year was the amount of time they were given to remove all their belongings and structures that they wanted to keep. After Friday, Afognak can do what they wish with whatever is left on site. With only the matriarch of the family still living in Kodiak, very little was rescued, and the home and outbuildings remain where they have been for three decades.
    When KMXT first brought you the story of the Malmbergs, we were unable to reach a spokesman for the Afognak Native Corporation for comment. While the story did quote Afognak lawyers and officials extensively from court documents, we felt compelled to follow up with the corporation.

 

    Below is our first story in this series, followed by Tom Malmberg's letter to Afognak Native Corporation, the corporation's response to KMXT's first story, and Mieke Malmberg's response to the Afognak letter.

Family Hopes to Save Homestead of 30 Years  

pdf 2011final_letter_to_valley_sent_by_tmalmberg

pdf letter_to_shareholders_from_bod

pdf malmberg_response

 

malmberg-homestead.jpg

 The Malmberg Homestead on the shores of Dry Spruce Bay.

Read more...
 
Feb 26 2014
ASMI Announces Photo Contest Winners
Wednesday, 26 February 2014

This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

           The Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute announced the winners of its Alaska fishing families photo contest last week. More than 700 entries were submitted to the contest, which ran from January 1 to February 2. Winners were chosen for various categories, including Facebook favorite, best humor photo, best boat photo and best throwback photo, among others. The winners include submissions from all around the state, including Kodiak, and are featured online at photocontest.alaskaseafood.org.
           In a press release from ASMI, the organization said the photo entries might be used for future marketing purposes worldwide, both online and in print. 
 

 
Feb 26 2014
KHS Alumna Recognized for Environmental Work
Wednesday, 26 February 2014

2.85 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

           A recent Kodiak High School graduate will be recognized statewide later this year as a Spirit of Youth Award recipient. Leila Pyle graduated from KHS in 2013, and will be honored during an awards dinner on April 5 in Anchorage.
           Karen Zeman is the executive director of Spirit of Youth and said the group began in 1996 as a way to recognize positive ways students are contributing to their local communities. She said it is kind of like a year-long recognition 

           “We receive nominations for over 150 teens every year. These are youth that some community member took the time to nominate for recognition. And every young person is recognized through a ceremony put on by their local school board and they’re also featured on the Spirit of Youth radio series which is aired on virtually every public radio station across Alaska. But the year culminates with the Spirit of Youth award which is given to 22 teens, two teens in each of our 11 award categories.”
            Pyle is one of two award winners statewide in the science and environment category. She said she didn’t know she was even nominated until she got the call that she won, but found out the recognition was related to the work she did for the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge.
            “I worked there last summer as part of the Youth Conservation Core crew. We spent part of the time in town working at the visitor center and we would lead kids activities and environmental education programs and we had trainings on climate change and recycling in Kodiak. And we cleaned up a beach as part of the Island Trails Network marine debris clean up project. And then we spent three weeks of the summer out in the field on the refuge at remote sites doing maintenance at refuge public use cabins and helping with ongoing refuge field projects.”

Read more...
 
Feb 25 2014
Turning the Tide Against Marine Debris: Part One
Tuesday, 25 February 2014

5.74 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

nets.jpg

Derelict fishing nets are seen strewn across a beach on the northeast side of Shuyak Island. Kodiak Island Trails Network Director Andy Schroeder said he hopes to send crews to clean up this portion of the archipelago this summer. Brianna Gibbs Photo 

 

 

This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Today we begin part one of a three-part series examining marine debris, and where places in Alaska, specifically Kodiak, stand in clean up efforts.
It’s been about three years since the tsunami in Japan washed away entire towns, sending thousands of tons of debris out to sea, subject to the mercy of ocean currents. Less than eight months after the tsunami, items started showing up in Alaska and have continued to do so in the months and years since. 


japenese_writing.jpg

A plastic float of unknown origin is found on a beach on northeast side of Shuyak Island.Schroeder said debris has been washing up from around the world for decades, so linking any particular piece to the 2011 Japanese Tsunami isn't always easy. Brianna Gibbs Photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It will still be a few months before clean up crews will take to Kodiak’s beaches, but as KMXT’s Brianna Gibbs recently learned, the planning process for those clean ups is already well under way.

 

andy.jpgSchroeder holds up one of marine debris' biggest culprits -- plastic water bottles. He said most of what is washing up on beaches is plastic, but more often then not it is the by-product of single-use 21st Century lifestyle, and not from the 2011 Japanese Tsunami. Brianna Gibbs Photo

 
<< Start < Prev 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Next > End >>

Results 316 - 330 of 5052