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Copyright vEsti24
Jan 02 2009
Cold Weather Prep PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 02 January 2009

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            With winter weather and colder than normal temperatures hitting the usually mild Kodiak, experts agree there are a few simple rules to follow when it comes to fire safety, automobiles and caring for pets as Alaskans brace for the cold. KMXT's Erik Wander has more.

 

 

            Kodiak Fire Chief Rome Kamai said people should contact local heating companies to help them assess their needs in keeping fuel and water lines from freezing. But he warns that using propane torches is generally not recommended for thawing already frozen pipes. He also said people who wish to keep lines from freezing themselves should only use products that have been tested and certified as safe by either Underwriters Laboratory or Factory Mutual. Kamai said following manufacturers' recommendations on such products is always important.

 

--          (Kamai 1         53 sec              "With heat tape ... a carbon dioxide detector.")

 

            Robert Amberg, electrical technician and owner of Custom Concepts in Kodiak, offered several tips on keeping vehicles running smoothly in cold weather conditions. He recommends installing a remote-starter, which is a specialty of his.

 

--          (Amberg 1       51 sec  "Definitely, the biggest thing ... and run back in the house.")

 

            Cristie Quiner is a veterinarian's assistant at the Soldotna Animal Hospital. She said several measures can be taken to limit exposure to the cold when it comes to dogs and cats.

 

--          (Quiner 1        45 sec  "If it's not a long-haired dog ... cats frost-bite very easily.")

 

            Quiner said shelter from the cold is key when caring for larger animals, such as horses, during the winter months.

 

--          (Quiner 2        12 sec  "You always want to ... especially to the wind.")

 

Kamai, Amberg and Quiner agree that following these simple suggestions can prevent cold weather-related problems until warmer weather arrives. I'm Erik Wander

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