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Copyright vEsti24
Jun 25 2014
Reel History: Tall Tales, Peterson Kids and Backwards Music PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 25 June 2014

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Yasent Oliver/KMXT
           Hello, my name is Yasent Oliver, a summer intern at KMXT as part of the station’s summer archiving project. This week I listened to many tapes of the show “More Tall Tales for Short People,” all but one of which were produced and hosted by Jaime Rodriguez. One thing that particularly stood out to me was what happened after the first part of the 1985 recording of “Storm Boy” was over.
           The story that the Peterson students told was titled “Supper with the Queen.” While I listened to the story, one of the characters does something particularly odd.
           So, just to recap what happened, upon eating soup made of onions, bananas, and pigs’ feet, one of the characters whips out some chocolate cake from their pocket and adds it to the soup, stating that, “anything tastes better with chocolate cake.”
Something else I listened to was an Alaska Fisheries Report from 1993, that happened to be backwards. While I was listening to the nonsense that is English being spoken backwards, I heard something very cool; the transition music sounds amazing backwards.
            Now isn’t that amazing; it still sounds like music when it’s backwards. Ultimately we were able to edit the audio so it played the right way, like this:

           Fun fact -- the "new technology" Welch refers to is actually email. Remember, this is from 1993.

           Thanks for listening to this recap of the most interesting things I found this week. This is Yasent Oliver, wishing you a good rest of your day.

 
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