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Copyright vEsti24
Apr 15 2014
From Beans to Brew: A Closer Look at Kodiak Coffee Roasting PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 15 April 2014

4.35 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

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Gary Barnes, the coffee roaster for Harborside Coffee and Goods, holds two different varieties of raw coffee beans. The beans become brown after the roasting process. Brianna Gibbs Photo

 

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            Kodiak is known for its abundant natural resources, but coffee isn’t one of them. That’s why a handful of local coffee roasters must often work internationally to bring some of the best beans to the island, where they are roasted locally and served in one of the many coffee shops along the road system. KMXT’s Brianna Gibbs got curious about that roasting process, and decided to get in touch with one of Kodiak’s coffee connoisseurs, to better understand the work that goes into a morning cup of Joe.

gary_barnes.jpgBarnes stands beside his coffee roaster, which he has affectionately named Sharon. He has been roasting on this same roaster since he first acquired it in 1995. Brianna Gibbs Photo  

 
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