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Copyright vEsti24
Feb 27 2014
Turning the Tide Against Marine Debris: Part Two PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 27 February 2014

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Even from 500 feet above, multicolored marine debris is visible from beaches on Shuyak Island. Kodiak Island Trails Network Director Andy Schroeder uses aerial surveys like this to help plan upcoming clean ups. Brianna Gibbs Photo

 

 

 

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Today we bring you part two of our series examining marine debris, and where places in Alaska, specifically Kodiak, stand in clean up efforts.
            When the Japanese Tsuanmi washed away entire towns three years ago, it left much of the West Coast of the United States wondering if and when debris would start showing up on American shorelines. Less than eight months later, it did, and has continued to wash up since.            

            Clean up efforts have been well underway, but funding those operations is a huge part of the battle. KMXT’s Brianna Gibbs has more on the financial side of marine debris. 

 

 
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