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Young St. George Scientists Share Studies on Talk of the Rock PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 09 July 2013

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            Today on Talk of the Rock we’ll hear about the future of science, or to be more specific, future scientists. Three high school students from St. George Island were in Kodiak for the past few days to learn about different research methods being used by NOAA, UAF and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.     The three students have been studying Pribilof Island Blue King Crab Ecology for the past five years and wanted to acquire new tools and training to advance their studies. Anthony Lekanof is one of the students participating and said their focus is finding out why the blue king crab population went down.

           “That could be a number of reasons from over fishing, climate change, just evolution basically. So we’ve been studying different types of ways of how we can improve and also ways to how we can also conserve,”
he said.

          You can listen to the full interview with Lekanof and his scientific peers during Talk of the Rock, today at 12:30 p.m. The trio will discuss their research, what they learned while in Kodiak and opportunities for other youth in Alaska to get involved with science.
 

 
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