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Copyright vEsti24
Aug 22 2012
Sandwich in a Can: Not as Strange as it Sounds PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 22 August 2012

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candwich-1.jpgJay Barrett/KMXT

            Have you ever found yourself scrambling up Pillar Mountain because there's a tsunami warning and you wished you had brought more with you than just a bag of corn chips to eat? Or have you ever stood in front of a pop machine while studying late, wishing it vended some munchies too? Well, a guy in Utah has you covered.

 

 

-- (Candwich 1            10 sec              "One day I was eating a cookie ... out of the soft drink machine.")

 

            What Mark Kirkland eventually came up with was the Candwich - the sandwich in a can. It's not nearly as weird as it sounds. The peanut butter and jam comes with a bun a little bigger than a dinner roll and large packets of creamy peanut butter and grape jelly. And the taste? Just like a PB&J should.

            You might be wondering at this point how KMXT got turned on to the Candwich and why we're sharing it. Well, every day news people get inundated with email from PR people pitching everything from talk show guests to bacon-flavored gum, and mostly we take a pass on them. But living in a town that's prone to attracting natural disasters, extremely bad weather and occasionally spotty electrical service, a shelf-stable sandwich in a can had its appeal.

 

-- (Candwich 2            39 sec              "It's not a bunch of preservatives ... a long period of time.")

 

            Mark One Foods, which Mark Kirkland founded to develop and sell the Candwich, currently has two flavors, the aforementioned PB&J, and honey barbeque chicken, which is more of a "Hot-Pocket" type sandwich. Kirkland says you don't necessarily have to heat up the barbeque chicken to enjoy, but it is tasty warm:

 

-- (Candwich 3            18 sec              "I have a friend who's a doctor ... let them warm up in your car.")

 

            If you're thinking the Candwich might work well for hunters or the military while out in the field, Kirkland is way ahead of you:

 

-- (Candwich 4            23 sec              "The military has spent a lot ... fine under their formulation.

 

            Kirkland said there are a dozen more flavors coming out, including burritos and pizza pockets.

            The cans themselves are a lot like a Pringles container, or something you might find the Pillsbury Doughboy on the cover of. Larger cans - about the size of a Rockstar or Monster energy drink - with chips and cookies included are on their way as well.

 

 

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