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Copyright vEsti24
Jun 25 2012
Selby Sees Space Potential for Kodiak, State PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 25 June 2012

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            Kodiak Island Borough Mayor Jerome Selby participated in the Alaska Rocket and Space Summit last Thursday, though had to do so via teleconference since the assembly had a meeting that night. He said folks attending were from Lockheed, Boeing and other launch clients and launch facilitators, including Frank DiBello, the CEO of Space Florida.

 

 

-- (Selby 1                   29 sec              "Particularly of interest was ... Canaveral there in Florida.")

 

            He said Space Florida is limited to launching rockets only in one direction, which could open up opportunities here in Kodiak.

 

-- (Selby 2                   26 sec              "He was all excited about Kodiak ... work with jointly in the future.")

 

            Selby said a minimum of 14 polar-orbit launches per year are projected to be needed in the next few years.

            He added that putting together satellites is something else identified at the summit that Alaska could be ideal for:

 

-- (Selby 3                   42 sec              "Anchorage would probably be ... some fabrication in Anchorage.")

 

            Until the Lockheed Martin deal and the multi-million dollar infusions from the state the last few years, the Alaska Aerospace Corporation has not been on strong financial ground, especially after losing its Missile Defense Agency contract. Selby says he hopes all the pieces fall into place for its future success:

 

-- (Selby 4                   19 sec              "So overall it was an interesting ... to make that all happen.")

 

            The summit also included a panel discussion by three representatives from the university system: Tom Case, the chancellor of UAA; Bob McCoy, the director of the Geophysical Institute; and Helena Wisniewski, the dean of UAA's graduate school. They discussed how Alaskans could become better prepared for work in the aerospace industry in the state.

 

 

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