pic4.jpg

Support Public Radio

You can support public radio through underwriting and we can help you drive traffic to your place of business by reaching the educated, affluent and decidedly handsome KMXT listeners. Contact This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it today!

Station Blogs & Links

Freeform
Are you a KMXT volunteer with a blog or website about your show? This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 


Copyright vEsti24
afr_logo_screen_size.gif
wayback_kodiakbuttoncopy.jpg
Jun 05 2012
Commemorating the Katmai-Novarupta Eruption Centennial PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 05 June 2012

0 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

             One hundred years ago, the largest explosive volcanic eruption of the 20th century happened right here in Alaska. The Katmai-Novarupta explosion was 30 times bigger than the Mt. Saint Helens eruption in 1980 and bigger than all historic eruptions in Alaska combined.  

            The explosion happened on the Alaska Peninsula, about one hundred miles east of Kodiak city. Ash from the eruption would travel as far as the Mediterranean. The explosion was so loud that it was reportedly heard in Juneau, about 750 miles away. So much volcanic material was released that it destroyed everything in the surrounding 40 square miles. And then there was the ash that landed in Kodiak: So much fell in Kodiak that residents were evacuated onto the U.S. Revenue Cutter Manning, and President William Taft appealed to congress for an emergency appropriation of $100,000 for relief.          

            The volcano decimated Kodiak's fishing industry, destroyed homes, killed plants and wildlife and upended the lives of people on the archipelago.
            Today we'll explore the story of the eruption with help from Katmai expert Judy Fierstein, and Kodiak residents reading historical accounts provided by the Baranov Museum.

            Special thanks to Judy Fierstein at the U.S Geological Survey for her assistance and Anjuli Grantham at the Baranov Museum in Kodiak for researching and editing the historical accounts. Interpretations provided by Bailey Bass as Jesse Petellin, Iver Malutin as John Orloff, Coast Guard Lt. Dave Cory as Captain K.W. Perry, Darcy Stielstra as William Erskine, Senator Gary Stevens as President William Taft, Alaska Department of Fish and Game Regional Director Steve Honnold as Bureau of Fisheries agent Fred M. Chamberlain and Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge biologist Bill Pyle as Bureau of Fisheries agent Barton Warren Evermann.

 

Individual Historical Accounts

 

Bailey Bass as Jesse Petellin

0 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

 

Iver Malutin as John Orloff

0 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

 

Coast Guard Lt. Dave Cory as Captain K.W. Perry

7.02 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

 

Darcy Stielstra as William Erskine

1.25 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

 

Senator Gary Stevens as President William Taft

0 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

 

Alaska Department of Fish and Game Regional Director Steve Honnold as Bureau of Fisheries agent Fred M. Chamberlain

0 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

   

Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge biologist Bill Pyle as Bureau of Fisheries agent Barton Warren Evermann

0 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

 

Theresa Pikus Miller as Hildred Davies Erskine

0 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

 

Kodiak Daily Mirror Editor James Brooks/ San Francisco Chronicle Report

0 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

 

Hannah Johnson as Nellie Erskine

0 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

 

 

 

 
< Prev   Next >