pic3.jpg

Donate to KMXT

button_7.png
button_5.png

Support Public Radio

You can support public radio through underwriting and we can help you drive traffic to your place of business by reaching the educated, affluent and decidedly handsome KMXT listeners. Contact This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it today!

Station Blogs & Links

Freeform
Are you a KMXT volunteer with a blog or website about your show? This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Copyright vEsti24
kmxt_logo.jpg
News
Aug 16 2011
Freeze-Drying May Lead to Salmon In Space PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 16 August 2011

0 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

            In the near future, astronauts could be treated to the delicacy of Alaska wild salmon; even as they orbit high above the ocean the fish came from.

Alexandra Oliveira and Brian Himelbloom, associate professors at the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, and a team of researchers have been studying the potential of freeze-dried sockeye salmon as astronaut food using funding from the University of Alaska's Space Grant Program.

Himelbloom said freeze-drying food is common because it extends the shelf life of a product while retaining nutritional value. Unlike conventional drying, freeze-drying involves lowering both the pressure and the temperature so the structure of the product remains intact.

Read more...
 
Aug 16 2011
Former Resident Relates Akhiok Water/Sewer Troubles PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 16 August 2011

0 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

            Yesterday, KMXT gave you a glimpse into the failing water and sewer infrastructure for the small village of Akhiok, located on the south end of Kodiak Island. Because the water plant can't treat the water to the standards the Environmental Protection Agency sets, Vice-Mayor Dan McCoy said village residents often boil water to ensure its safety.

            Teacon Simeonoff grew up in Akhiok but has since moved to Old Harbor. He visits Akhiok regularly and wishes the water was as good as it is in Old Harbor. Because he grew up in Akhiok, he said he knows when and when not to drink the water.

Another obstacle for the village is getting water into the tanks. Electricity is shut off for nine hours each night so the plant cannot pump water up to the tanks to be stored for the residents.

Because the reservoir is shared by animals in the area, the village is forced to be on constant water watch.

Read more...
 
Aug 15 2011
Water/Sewer Systems Falling Apart in Akhiok PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 15 August 2011

0 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

danmccoyexplainsrepairs.jpg

Akhiok Vice-Mayor Dan McCoy points out some of the constant repairs he must make on the dilapidated water treatment equipment in his community. Photo courtesy Rep. Alan Austerman

 

This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

            For the residents of Akhiok, a small village on the south end of Kodiak Island, access to clean drinking water is a daily challenge. Every day, Vice-Mayor Dan McCoy gets calls from the community asking if the water is safe to drink. Often times it isn't, and McCoy must get on the VHF radio and tell everyone to boil their water until further notice. 

            The village gets its drinking water from a small reservoir nearby. McCoy said he is always concerned about the water levels, but even when the levels are high, making sure the water is safe to drink is the biggest challenge.

            Because of the poor infrastructure, water isn't given enough contact time with the chlorine, so it runs the risk of housing bacteria even after it is treated. McCoy said even if the equipment were in perfect working order, there is no way it would be able to keep up with clean water standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency.

            McCoy said many families fly in bottled water because they never know how safe the water really is. He said the equipment is so bad that every day he opens the door to the pump house expecting a flood. If that day ever does come, the villagers will have to boil all the water they use.

            And while the water situation is bad, the sewer situation in the village is worse.

            The sewer is supposed to run out into deeper water, but the pipe is broken closer to shore. McCoy said he regularly has to tell children to stop playing on the beaches because the sewer is running near them. The sewer system is in such disarray that if the EPA wanted to it could start fining the village daily.

             McCoy said Akhiok's battle for clean water and a proper sewer system isn't new. He has been trying to get funding to fix the problem for more than seven years, but has had little success.

             Two weeks ago, staff members from Representative Alan Austerman's office came down to document the problem. McCoy hopes their experience will shed some light on Akhiok's dire situation in Juneau.

            In the meantime, the village of Akhiok remains on constant water watch, and McCoy continues to make repairs to a system far beyond broken.

Read more...
 
Aug 15 2011
New Online Tool Helps Ferry Riders Plan PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 15 August 2011

0 MB | Download MP3 | Open in popup

 

ferry_tracking_map.jpgJay Barrett/KMXT

            The Alaska Marine Highway System will soon unveil a new online tool that will help the public know exactly when their ship will come in. Ferry system chief Mike Neussl in Juneau says the new System Map has an interactive online interface that allows users - even on smart phones - to find nearly every ship in the fleet with pinpoint accuracy.

Read more...
 
Aug 15 2011
Getting the Skinny on the 99615 PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 15 August 2011

This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

            More than 60 percent are married, more than half make $50,000 or more, and nearly 20 percent are college graduates.

            Sound like anyone you know? Well, you probably do know them as that is a number-crunched look at the population base of the 99615 zip code.

            The ZIPskinny website pulls info from the U.S. Census database and plugs it into graphs and charts about schools, jobs, income and social indicators.

While the site should not be taken as the final authority on Kodiak data, it does provide a quick glance at some interesting statistics.

For instance, 86 percent of Kodiak residents 25 or older are high school graduates and six percent hold graduate or higher level degrees.

Twenty-five percent of those 15 or older have never been married, while 10 percent were divorced at the time the data was collected.

Kodiak's high transiency rate is evident by the fact that only 37 percent of residents had lived in the same home five years or longer.

            You've likely heard that men in Alaska far outnumber women. Not so in Kodiak where the population is split almost equally between men and women, with the median age for both sexes just about 32-years-old.

            Since the U.S. Census site hasn't posted detailed figures from the 2010 census, some of the information posted by ZIPskinny may be dated even though it is the most current available.

 
<< Start < Prev 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 Next > End >>

Results 3401 - 3425 of 6119